Sunday, March 02, 2008

TIF March - The Little Details!

It is the little details that one involved in the visual arts enjoys the most, I think - no matter what the chosen medium for expression. I would not take anything for the ability to notice and to observe these things! The first image that popped into my head when I saw Sharon B's chosen color palette for this month was my beautiful book, TO WEAVE FOR THE SUN - involving Andean textiles, and published by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Coincidentally, I had lying on my work table three skeins of DMC floss in almost these colors - so this led to a rummage through my stash to find more. I have pulled a color that is more burgundy than purple, as the red is dominant in the Peruvian weavings. Also, I have always preferred navy to black for needlepoint, as it isn't so harsh. My father was an archaeologist at heart, (but by education and profession a petroleum geologist) - and he indoctrinated me early about Latin American things, including the textiles. I remember at a very early age, looking at a Mexican China Poblana dress, and being enchanted by the embroidery details. This led to curiosity about other regional dresses and folk art, which I have spent many years studying from time to time. At some point, I was given a book on charted Inca motifs, which I immediately applied to counted cross stitch and needlpoint. My files are still growing, as I cut out more and more pictures of ethnic weaves - and I have shelves full of books on the subject to inspire me. The cover of the book I have mentioned is from a piece woven in about the 16th century, as the Spanish influence was creeping in. I haven't seen much green in the pre-Columbian work. Then another Spanish influenced work! The filet lace has nothing to do with the color scheme, but I found it very interesting that it is dated back to the 11th century! This same type of lace was the earliest developed in Europe at about the same time, and originated in Italy - where by about the 18th century, it was translated also to crochet. I have found over the years that many of the design motifs one sees in one location, are also abundant in another. An example of this is the "Buddha's Path" fret that I first encountered on the Japanese Imari porcelains - it is also found in Native American art and in South America! and India, where it probably originated. Makes one wonder!! Anyway, my goal for March is to use the palette colors and some details to create a needlepoint design that I have long wanted an excuse to do. This fish, long one of my favorites, has to be admired, as it is a superb example of the astonishing expertise of the Andean needlcrafters - it is a woven tapestry applique - 25 sided!! The date is approximately 1000 to 1476 A.D. It is just this sort of detail that makes life so interesting and a constant learning experience! and wouldn't this make a marvelous pillow in needlepoint? These motifs are so geometric and mathematical - just the kind I enjoy most.

8 comments:

Ira said...

Great histirical article. I love you work.
I tagget you.

Angelcat said...

I really enjoyed reading this post about historic textiles. I can't wait to see how you interpret your chosen design, it looks wonderful

Jane said...

I love historic needlework, and haven't seen much on the Americas. Thank you for sharing.
Jane

Allison Ann Aller said...

You really love this subject! Thank you for bringing your passion to us...and that is one great fish.

Lupita said...

Gracias por tú visita ....tienes trabajos muy bonitos.

Besos desde México.

NCPat said...

This is very interesting! So, what are you going to create?

neki desu said...

great post, thank you!
me too, i find that duplicity fascinating.not only in design, but also in foundational myths.

neki desu

jude said...

great post yes, very interesting.....